PtP Highlighted at Recent World Bank Spring Meeting Session on Combatting Corruption

At the recent the World Bank Spring Meetings in Washington, DC, Project Director Lester Salamon had an opportunity to introduce PtP’s potential for encouraging citizen involvement in anti-corruption efforts—a point which was highlighted as one of the “6 Takeaways From the World Bank Spring Meetings,” as excerpted below. By Sophie Edwards // 19 April 2018   WASHINGTON — Representatives from the World Bank, business, technology companies, media, and law enforcement discussed ways in which they can work together to combat corruption during the Spring Meetings….   Wednesday’s session brought together a diverse range of actors from government, the private sector, media, and academia to discuss new ways and challenges to ending corruption.     6. New models for spending seized assets “Citizens will not get serious about working on corruption unless they see a better result coming from the capture of corrupt assets than they are seeing now,” according to Lester Salamon, director of the Center for Civil Society Studies at Johns Hopkins University. “Currently, these assets are put back into government agencies and flow back into corruption,”...

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“How to Apply PtP to State-Owned Enterprises” by William L. Megginson and Lester M. Salamon

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Chelsea Newhouse Governments around the world have recently been involved in a significant new wave of privatizations-sales of state-owned enterprises to private companies. The 48-month period between January 2013 and December 2016 saw governments raise more money through privatization sales than during any comparable previous period. Yet three times worth of government enterprises than the $3.5 trillion sold since 1977 still remain in government hands, many of them awaiting sale. What happens to the vast resources secured through such sales? Too often, it is difficult to determine. Stories of widespread corruption are rampant. Even when the proceeds are appropriately channeled into government budgets, however, their uses are hard to track. But these are the people’s assets, often the only real assets a population has. Surely a case can be made for handling them more responsibly and ensuring that citizens get a clearer benefit from their use. This is especially so given what is often the “upside-down” effects such asset sales can produce-yielding positive economic benefits for companies and citizens that are often long in coming and too dispersed to be clearly felt; while producing immediate harms in the form of lost jobs and community disruptions...

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“How to Apply PtP to Stolen or Stranded Assets” by Aaron Bornstein and Lester M. Salamon

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Chelsea Newhouse According to a recent UN report, close to US$4 trillion is stolen from governments or generated by bribes or other forms of corruption each year in countries around the world—an annual sum well above the total budgets of numerous developing and transition country governments. Despite often heroic efforts, however, the record of successful discovery, confiscation, and effective return for social re-use of these vast assets has been frustratingly meager. This limited success in returning such assets for effective social re-use is largely due to the complexity of the process. Also at work, however, is that so much of the attention has had to focus on the challenges of locating, documenting, freezing, and confiscating stolen assets that too little attention has been available to focus on the all-important question of what to do with these assets if and when they become available for potential return. The document being released today seeks to remedy this shortcoming by focusing on one of the most promising of the social re-use and return options available. This is the option exemplified by the case of the BOTA Foundation in Kazakhstan, and by close to 600 other foundations that have...

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