PtP in the News: World Financial Review article on PtP and stolen assets

A new article focusing on PtP has been published in the latest edition of The World Financial Review. Noting that past experience with the return of stolen assets to governments has too often led to disappointing results, this brief piece, “Where Should All the Stolen Money Go?,” urges consideration instead of applying the Philanthropication thru Privatization, or PtP, concept, which calls for the placement of such assets into carefully structured, private charitable foundations as exemplified in the BOTA Foundation in Kazakhstan and many other foundations around the world. This solution produces win-win benefits for countries and citizens alike, helps mobilize citizens for anti-corruption action, and ensures that preciously needed resources are used transparently and accountably to benefit citizens and not dumped into government coffers or returned to the corruption stream. In this challenging time, when massive emergency funding from governments has intensified concerns about potential corruption, it is more important than ever to ensure that when corruption-generated resources are identified and returned they are truly dedicated to citizen needs. The PtP approach is a proven alternative for achieving this. Please feel free to share the article with those in your networks. You can read the full article from The...

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PtP in the News: WINGS Philanthropy in Focus Blog Highlights PtP

A new article by Project Director Lester Salamon published on the WINGS Philanthropy in Focus blog introduces a promising new route to creating endowed charitable foundations through the process we have termed “Philanthropication thru Privatization,” or PtP for short. This process involves capturing for charitable endowments the proceeds of a host of non-traditional transactions under way around the world. These transactions involve assets that are “invisible in plain sight:” they are in the ground in the form of mineral deposits, in the air in the form of broadband spectrum auctions, in foreign banks in the form of stolen assets, and in legal cases imposing penalties for corporate misdeeds. The PtP Project has already identified well over 600 foundations around the world that have gained endowments from such transactions. This brief piece provides a concise overview of the PtP initiative, introduces the asset classes to which this concept has already been applied, and provides examples of the resulting foundations. We are actively involved in promoting the implementation of this concept in locales across the world and would be eager to learn of possibilities in other areas. Please contact us. Please feel free to share this article with those in your...

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“How to Apply PtP to State-Owned Enterprises” by William L. Megginson and Lester M. Salamon

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Chelsea Newhouse Governments around the world have recently been involved in a significant new wave of privatizations-sales of state-owned enterprises to private companies. The 48-month period between January 2013 and December 2016 saw governments raise more money through privatization sales than during any comparable previous period. Yet three times worth of government enterprises than the $3.5 trillion sold since 1977 still remain in government hands, many of them awaiting sale. What happens to the vast resources secured through such sales? Too often, it is difficult to determine. Stories of widespread corruption are rampant. Even when the proceeds are appropriately channeled into government budgets, however, their uses are hard to track. But these are the people’s assets, often the only real assets a population has. Surely a case can be made for handling them more responsibly and ensuring that citizens get a clearer benefit from their use. This is especially so given what is often the “upside-down” effects such asset sales can produce-yielding positive economic benefits for companies and citizens that are often long in coming and too dispersed to be clearly felt; while producing immediate harms in the form of lost jobs and community disruptions...

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“How to Apply PtP to Stolen or Stranded Assets” by Aaron Bornstein and Lester M. Salamon

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Chelsea Newhouse According to a recent UN report, close to US$4 trillion is stolen from governments or generated by bribes or other forms of corruption each year in countries around the world—an annual sum well above the total budgets of numerous developing and transition country governments. Despite often heroic efforts, however, the record of successful discovery, confiscation, and effective return for social re-use of these vast assets has been frustratingly meager. This limited success in returning such assets for effective social re-use is largely due to the complexity of the process. Also at work, however, is that so much of the attention has had to focus on the challenges of locating, documenting, freezing, and confiscating stolen assets that too little attention has been available to focus on the all-important question of what to do with these assets if and when they become available for potential return. The document being released today seeks to remedy this shortcoming by focusing on one of the most promising of the social re-use and return options available. This is the option exemplified by the case of the BOTA Foundation in Kazakhstan, and by close to 600 other foundations that have...

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